Iran to present 9 domestically-made supercomputers

Posted on February 20, 2012

0


Iran will present nine domestically made supercomputers by late of this year (March 21), IRNA quotes Iran’s Vice president on science and technology Nasrin Soltanzadeh as saying.

“Nine new supercomputers will be presented, and added to the National Grid,” she said.

It is planned to establish a National Grid network consisting of 11 supercomputers in total in Iran. Last year the country has already unveiled two domestically-designed and manufactured supercomputers in Tehran’s Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), and Esfahan University of Technology.

During the ceremony in 2011, President Ahmadinejad encouraged Iranian scientists and researchers to develop evermore self-belief, saying Iran must become “a scientific and technological reference for the world.”

It was also pointed out that Iran managed to become one of the world’s ten countries that design and manufacture supercomputers in a short time.

Amirkabir University’s supercomputer has a power of 34,000 billion operations per second, and a speed of 40 gigahertz. The project was carried out by a group of 20 Iranian researchers from the faculties of electricity and computer.

The other supercomputer project carried out by Esfahan University of Technology is among the world’s top 500 supercomputers.

Iran’s first supercomputer was introduced about nine years ago with a power of 860 billion operations per second by AUT. The machines were introduced in Iran around 10 years by the AUT. Iranian engineers and technicians have been making efforts to increase the computational capacities of the devices ever since.

Supercomputers are computers that are at the frontline of current processing capacity, particularly speed of calculation.

They are used for highly calculation-intensive tasks such as problems involving quantum physics, weather forecasting, climate research, molecular modeling, physical simulations (such as simulation of airplanes in wind tunnels, etc.), and nuclear research.

Advertisements